BACK TO ALL STORIES

Columbia

Stories from Columbia

Mental Health and Disability: 'I Was Depressed Before the Blindness'

Mental Health and Disability: 'I Was Depressed Before the Blindness'

DeAnna Quietwater Noriega and Gretchen Maune, who’s a friend of mine, both live in Columbia and are blind.

They recently spoke about some of their health conditions that exist separately from their blindness and about some of the additional barriers they come up against in the health care system as a result of their blindness.

'It Has Increased From What It Was, But There's Still Further to Go'

'It Has Increased From What It Was, But There's Still Further to Go'

Samantha Dyroff and Megan Anderson are both medical students at the University of Missouri. They both work with MedZou, a student-run health clinic here in town. When we spoke to them, Megan was a second-year student and the transgender health coordinator, and Samantha was a first-year medical student and ran the specialty services for MedZou.

They spoke about some of misconceptions others have about the patients they work with through the recently opened specialty clinic that offers free and inclusive healthcare to transgender Missourians and about some of the barriers to care that their patients who are transgender can face.

'There's Absolutely Nothing Like This Out There, and We've Been Waiting'

'There's Absolutely Nothing Like This Out There, and We've Been Waiting'

Megan Anderson and Samantha Dyroff are both medical students at the University of Missouri. They both work with MedZou, a student-run health clinic here in town. When we spoke to them, Megan was a second-year student and the transgender health coordinator, and Samantha was a first-year medical student and ran the specialty services for MedZou.

They spoke about a recently opened specialty clinic at MedZou that offers free and inclusive healthcare for transgender Missourians, and about what that clinic has meant to some of their patients.

'Your E.R. Doctor Should Not Be the Person You Get Your General Medications From'

'Your E.R. Doctor Should Not Be the Person You Get Your General Medications From'

Megan Anderson and Samantha Dyroff are both medical students at the University of Missouri. They also both work with MedZou, a student-run health clinic here in town, and hold positions within the organization. They spoke about some of the barriers – including insurance coverage – that their patients face.

'Our Dogs are More Than Pets. They're Our Eyes on a Leash'

'Our Dogs are More Than Pets. They're Our Eyes on a Leash'

DeAnna Quietwater Noriega and Gretchen Maune, who’s a friend of mine, both live in Columbia and are blind.

They spoke about some of the additional complications and costs that can come along with their adaptive technologies – i.e. their service dogs. For DeAnna, that’s Enzo, a German Shepard, and for Gretchen, Keeper, a Golden Retriever.

'You Were Saying the Right Things, but the Tone of Your Voice Wasn't Matching Your Words'

'You Were Saying the Right Things, but the Tone of Your Voice Wasn't Matching Your Words'

Gretchen Maune and DeAnna Quietwater Noriega are friends who live here in Columbia, and Gretchen’s actually been a friend of mine for several years.

Gretchen and Deanna are both blind, and they spoke about the first time they met – now many years ago - at a support group.

'You Decide to Get Your Scooter Fixed or Whether You Want to Eat'

'You Decide to Get Your Scooter Fixed or Whether You Want to Eat'

Brothers Chuck and Drew Graham live in Columbia, Missouri, and both have been paralyzed for many years.They spoke about their issues with physical access in the Columbia community and about some of the tough decisions they are forced to make.

'The More You Share, the More You Give Away - the More that Comes Back to You'

'The More You Share, the More You Give Away - the More that Comes Back to You'

Bill Gordon lives in Sedalia, Missouri. He spoke at the “Breaking it Down: Homelessness in Missouri” event that KBIA and Missouri Heath Talks hosted at Café Berlin on December 6th.

Bill shared his personal experiences with homelessness – having been homeless in Columbia in the 90s and being a graduate of Welcome Home, a group that assists homeless veterans here in town.

Here he reflects on how his time being homeless changed him.

'Everybody Needs Dignity, and When it's Been Taken Away From You, You Need it Even More.'

'Everybody Needs Dignity, and When it's Been Taken Away From You, You Need it Even More.'

The cold winter months can be especially hard for people experiencing homelessness, but the faith communities in Columbia have collaborated to provide emergency winter shelter since 2008, hosted at various churches around the city – called Room at the Inn.

Jim Jantz and Rockie Alden, who both work with Room at the Inn, spoke about the health issues their guests most often face, as well as the importance of treating everyone with dignity.

'For Every Homeless Person, There Was a Point Much Earlier Where They Could Have Been Helped'

'For Every Homeless Person, There Was a Point Much Earlier Where They Could Have Been Helped'

Heather Harlan is prevention specialist and adolescent counselor at Phoenix Health Programs in Columbia. She says addiction to drugs like alcohol and tobacco often stems from childhood trauma, and substance use disorders can make it difficult for those experiencing homelessness, in particular, to get help.

She spoke about the importance of primary prevention of substance use disorders and about the challenges these disorders can create for those experiencing homelessness and their families

'I Wish I Could Spend the Rest of My Life in a Hospital, Because at Least People Care'

'I Wish I Could Spend the Rest of My Life in a Hospital, Because at Least People Care'

Robert Nickles lives in Columbia. He was recently diagnosed with lung cancer and has undergone numerous medical procedures throughout his life - including a colostomy. But there’s a major barrier standing between Robert and a healthy existence: Robert is homeless.

In his own words, he has lived a life that “most people wouldn’t understand.” Robert spoke with KBIA’s Jonah McKeown about the stigma surrounding homelessness and about the barriers he faces getting healthcare.

'The People that We are Working With are Humans Just Like Everybody Else'

'The People that We are Working With are Humans Just Like Everybody Else'

Katie Burnham Wilkins is the Homeless Program Coordinator at the Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans’ Hospital, and Blake Witter is the Program Coordinator for HUD-VASH, a program that combines Housing and Urban Development Vouchers with VA services to help homeless veterans get stable housing.

While the exact number of homeless veterans is hard to pin down, the Department of Housing and Urban Development released a reportlast year that found that although the number of homeless veterans has overall decreased by 17% since 2015, the number of homeless veterans in Missouri has slightly increased, to nearly 600.

Katie and Blake spoke about the challenges of reaching out to and housing homeless veterans in the Columbia community.

'We Don't Get Superpowers Just Because We Have a Disability'

'We Don't Get Superpowers Just Because We Have a Disability'

Madi Lawson and Taylor Kinnerup are best friends who attend the University of Missouri Journalism School together.

Madi was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy as a child, and then another rare form of muscular dystrophy year this. These two spoke about the future, their friendship and how it's changing following this most recent diagnosis.

Elizabeth Modde and Sam McMillen: 'It's Having People You Care About - and Who Care About You.'

Elizabeth Modde and Sam McMillen: 'It's Having People You Care About - and Who Care About You.'

Sam McMillen and Elizabeth Modde are both medical students at the University of Missouri, and they work with MedZou – a free community health clinic run by medical staff and students.

Sam is currently the Director of Patient Advocacy and Referrals, and he sat down with Elizabeth in May to discuss some of the healthcare struggles their homeless patients face, and how their relationships with patients has changed them.

Special: Missouri Health Talks on Oral Health

Special: Missouri Health Talks on Oral Health

Health reporter Rebecca Smith recently sat down with Dr. John Dane, the current state Dental Director, and Gary Harbison, the Executive Director for the Missouri Coalition for Oral Health.

In this 30 minute Missouri Health Talks Special, they cover the Missouri Oral Health Plan, which runs from 2015 to 2020, advances that have been made in oral health policy and struggles Missourians still face when it comes to accessing quality, affordable dental care.

You will also hear conversations gathered by Smith in June at the 6th Annual MOMOM, or Missouri Mission of Mercy, in Joplin. This yearly, two-day dental clinic put on by the Missouri Dental Association provides free dental care for anyone willing to wait in line. This year approximately 1,200 people were served and more than $800,000 worth of care was provided.

Max Lewis and Leslie Anderson: 'Cry for Help or Die'

Max Lewis and Leslie Anderson: 'Cry for Help or Die'

Max Lewis is a lawyer in Columbia. He's also quadriplegic and uses a program called Consumer Directed Services to hire in-home help with personal care. He sat down with Leslie Anderson, the director of policy and advocacy for Services for Independent Living.

They spoke about a significant change Missouri is likely making in how it supports people who need assistance to stay in their homes. In the past, if you were on Medicaid, the state would pay for someone to help an elderly or disabled person with personal care up to the cost to live in a nursing home.

Starting July 1, though, the state will only pay up to 60 percent of what it would cost to live in a nursing home. There are a very limited amount of waivers that would allow people to keep their full care, but these make up for a tiny fraction of the estimated 8,800 Missourians who need this kind of care.

For the rest, these changes may mean getting fewer hours of assistance or ending up in a nursing home.

Andrew Quint and Beth Rahn on How Patients Have Changed Their Lives

Andrew Quint and Beth Rahn on How Patients Have Changed Their Lives

Dr. Andrew Quint has been the Medical Director at Family Health Center in Columbia for many years. For the past 11 years, he has worked with nurse Beth Rahn. They spoke about the many patients they have seen over the years and how those patients have changed their lives.

Rene Powell and Traci Wilson-Kleekamp on Life with Disabilities

Rene Powell and Traci Wilson-Kleekamp on Life with Disabilities

Columbia resident Rene Powell spoke with her friend Traci Wilson-Kleekamp about what life has been like with a disability. They also spoke about how life has changed for Rene as her disabilities have become more visible - as she started using a walker recently to assist with her mobility.

Sawsan Hasan and Nadeem Ramiydh on Refugee PTSD

Sawsan Hasan and Nadeem Ramiydh on Refugee PTSD

Sawsan Hasan and Nadeem Ramiydh both work for the Refugee & Immigration Services office in Columbia. Both of them work with refugees on a daily basis and are from Iraq themselves. They spoke about the need for more mental health care within the refugee and immigrant communities – especially when it comes to dealing with PTSD.

Chuck and Drew Graham on Their Mom's 'Can-Do' Attitude

Chuck and Drew Graham on Their Mom's 'Can-Do' Attitude

Chuck and Drew Graham's mother served as their role model growing up in Louisiana, Missouri. She helped them face the road ahead after they became paraplegic and quadriplegic within a year and a half of each other in their teenage years.

Copyright 2017 KBIA and The University of Missouri. Development and Design by Nathan Lawrence.