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COVID-19

Stories about COVID-19

'We Have Seen Stillbirths in COVID Women - We Are Worried it Could Be Because of COVID.'

'We Have Seen Stillbirths in COVID Women - We Are Worried it Could Be Because of COVID.'

Dr. Laura Vricella is an OB-GYN and a maternal-fetal medicine specialist at Mercy Hospital in St. Louis.

She spoke about how the ongoing coronavirus pandemic has impacted her and her staff, and about some of the ways that COVID-19 infections seem to be impacting expectant mothers and their babies.

**Note: This piece does discuss infant loss and could be disturbing to some listeners.

Retired Nurse Reflects on Pandemic with Missouri on Mic: 'Somehow, We Got Through One of the Greatest Ordeals I've Lived Through'

Retired Nurse Reflects on Pandemic with Missouri on Mic: 'Somehow, We Got Through One of the Greatest Ordeals I've Lived Through'

Susan Good is a retired nurse who spent most of her career and the beginning of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic working in Tacoma, Washington.

She spoke with KBIA’s Missouri on Mic team at the Columbia Bicentennial event back on July 4th about what nursing during the pandemic in Washington state was like, and a little bit about why she’s chosen to retire to Columbia, Missouri.

You can find more Missouri on Mic conversations here or tune in to 91.3 FM on Mondays.

'With the Delta Variant, We Became a Hotspot, But Very Shortly Thereafter, Everybody Else Became a Hotspot.'

'With the Delta Variant, We Became a Hotspot, But Very Shortly Thereafter, Everybody Else Became a Hotspot.'

Dr. Saima Memon is the Medical Director of the Critical Care Department for Mercy Hospital in Joplin, as well the medical director for Respiratory Therapy.

For many weeks this summer, Joplin had one of the worst COVID-19 hospitalization rates in the country. So, she took a look back at the early days of this summer’s delta variant-fueled COVID-19 surge.

Nursing Through the Pandemic Has 'Really Made a Bigger Place Seem Smaller'

Nursing Through the Pandemic Has 'Really Made a Bigger Place Seem Smaller'

Kennedi Barker is a public health nurse for Columbia/Boone County Public Health and Human Services.

We spoke a few weeks ago during a mobile outreach vaccine clinic that she was working about how the more than 17 months of the pandemic – and working with Columbians from all walks of life – has impacted her.

In Joplin 'Nurses Are Seeing More Patients Die On a Weekend of Working Than in a Year in Pre-COVID Time'

In Joplin 'Nurses Are Seeing More Patients Die On a Weekend of Working Than in a Year in Pre-COVID Time'

Jeanee’ Kennedy is the Chief Nursing Officer for Freeman Health Systems in Joplin. For several weeks now, Joplin has had the worst COVID-19 hospitalization rate in the county.

In fact, Jeanee’ said their hospital recently had to open a third COVID unit to accommodate all of their patients.

She spoke about what she’s seeing in her community and about how this current surge is taking a toll on nurses and other frontline health workers.

COVID-19 Hospitalizations in Joplin: 'If You Love Your Community - It Causes You to do Action. One of Those Actions is Getting the Vaccine'

COVID-19 Hospitalizations in Joplin: 'If You Love Your Community - It Causes You to do Action. One of Those Actions is Getting the Vaccine'

Jeremy Drinkwitz is the President of the Mercy Hospital in Joplin. Joplin currently has the worst rate of COVID-19 hospitalizations in the county and three of the surrounding counties it serves are also in the top 10.

Prior to this delta variant-driven surge, Drinkwitz said their COVID-19 inpatient record high was 60 patients last November. But during the last several weeks, that has risen into the 70s, and – as of yesterday, to 81 COVID-19 inpatients.

So, Drinkwitz spoke about the impact of the current COVID-19 surge – and hospitalizations – on his community and hospital staff.

Columbia's Community Vaccine Clinics: 'We Can Reach People Where They Are'

Columbia's Community Vaccine Clinics: 'We Can Reach People Where They Are'

Trina Teacutter is the nursing supervisor for Columbia/Boone County Public Health and Human Services. She spoke about how they have changed their tactics when it comes to vaccinations, and how “coming to people where they are” – though community-based vaccination clinics – is allowing them to reach more members of the community.

You can view this list of community vaccine clinics - here

In SW Missouri: 'It's Becoming a Staffing Challenge to Take Care of the Rising Number of COVID Patients'

In SW Missouri: 'It's Becoming a Staffing Challenge to Take Care of the Rising Number of COVID Patients'

Amanda Hedgpeth is the vice president of hospital operations for the CoxHealth Hospital System based in Springfield, as well as their assistant commander for COVID-19 response.

She spoke about the current COVID-19 surge in Southwest Missouri, and about her concerns for her staff and community – as well as the rest of the state – if vaccination rates remain low and case numbers continue to rise.

Faith Communities After COVID-19: 'Never Take For Granted Being Able To Shake A Hand Or Hug Or Sing A Hymn'

Faith Communities After COVID-19: 'Never Take For Granted Being Able To Shake A Hand Or Hug Or Sing A Hymn'

Reverend Fred Leist and Teressa Gilbreth both work at Missouri United Methodist church in downtown Columbia.

They reflected on the past year or so of the coronavirus pandemic and spoke about how their congregation remained supportive through an emotionally taxing COVID-19 lockdown and how they’re NOW looking forward to rebuilding their community.

This piece was reported and produced by Levi Moltz-Hohmann.

Faith & Health: 'When People Are Hungry, We Feed Them. When People Are Struggling, We Journey With Them.'

Faith & Health: 'When People Are Hungry, We Feed Them. When People Are Struggling, We Journey With Them.'

Rev. Kirk Perucca is the Pastor of Covenant Presbyterian Church, a multi-cultural, multi-racial and multi-economic congregation in Kansas City.

He spoke with KBIA’s Levi Moltz-Hohmann about how his church has remained a resource for his community throughout the past year of the COVID-19 pandemic – and about how faith and health overlap.

This piece was reported and produced by Levi Moltz-Hohmann.

Hospital Ministry & COVID-19: 'It Seems a Lot Less Personal. But There's Still Power in Presence.'

Hospital Ministry & COVID-19: 'It Seems a Lot Less Personal. But There's Still Power in Presence.'

Father Francis Doyle is the pastor at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Columbia. He works closely with Deacon Michael Berendzen who coordinates the Columbia Catholic Hospital Ministry.

They spoke about how the Columbia Catholic Hospital ministry has had to make some changes to the Anointing of the Sick and hospital visits during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Food Insecurity in Our Community: 'The Pandemic Really Exacerbated That Problem'

Food Insecurity in Our Community: 'The Pandemic Really Exacerbated That Problem'

Joanne Nelson is the Director of the Boone County Community Services Department,and Lindsey Lopez is the President and CEO of The Food Bank for Central & Northeast Missouri.

They spoke with host Janet Saidi about the impact of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic on food insecurity in our community and about just a few of the resources that exist.

This is an excerpt from KBIA’s weekly talk show, the Check-In with Janet Saidi, on Thursday, February 25. You can hear the full show – here.

If you or anyone you know needs help – per the Boone County Department of Community Service:

“To find help with things like food, childcare, assistance paying household bills, medicine, healthcare, mental health services, or other essential services, please use our local guide to health and human services CoMoResources.

Or, contact United Way 2-1-1. It’s FREE and CONFIDENTIAL. Specialists are available 24/7. Dial 2-1-1 or 1-800-427-4626 (TTY 1-866-385-6525)”

Post-Vaccination: 'I Still Have to Do My Part. I Still Have to Wear My Mask. This is Just the Beginning'

Post-Vaccination: 'I Still Have to Do My Part. I Still Have to Wear My Mask. This is Just the Beginning'

Laurie Hines and Ted Glasgow have been together for many years. Laurie is a living kidney donor and the director of the Missouri Kidney Program. Ted is an accomplished bodybuilder and an immunocompromised kidney transplant recipient, which makes COVID-19 an even larger threat.

They spoke about their decision to receive the coronavirus vaccine, and about how receiving their first doses has and hasn’t impacted their daily lives.

On Understanding Grief: 'It Takes a Long Time. It Fades Out Over Time'

On Understanding Grief: 'It Takes a Long Time. It Fades Out Over Time'

Emily Arth is a licensed clinical social worker and a therapist in Columbia. She spoke with reporter Olivia Love about understanding grief and about how everyone needs to give themselves the space and time to process grief during the ongoing pandemic. She urges everyone to seek out help if they need it.

This piece was reported by Olivia Love.

Access to Reproductive Health Care 'Has Been a Challenge' During Ongoing Pandemic

Access to Reproductive Health Care 'Has Been a Challenge' During Ongoing Pandemic

Mallory Schwarz and Arzina Lakhani both work for NARAL Pro-Choice Missouri. Schwarz is the executive director and Lakhani is a policy intern.

They spoke about some of the effects the ongoing coronavirus pandemic has had on access to reproductive health care and abortions in Missouri.

This piece was reported and produced by Isabella Paxton.

The Ongoing Pandemic & Missouri Prisons: 'I'm Definitely in Fear Every Single Day'

The Ongoing Pandemic & Missouri Prisons: 'I'm Definitely in Fear Every Single Day'

Carlos Wade is an inmate at the Southeast Missouri Correctional Center in the Bootheel, who we talked to back in July. He recently updated me on how things are going inside prison – nearly ten months into the pandemic and after another round of cases at the facility.

According to the Missouri Department of Corrections, as of December 24, 2020, they have gotten most of the outbreaks back under control – with only 179 active inmate cases and 96 active prison staff cases.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, 39 inmates and 5 staff have died of the disease.

Nurses & the COVID-19 Vaccine: 'It Gives Us All a Little Bit of Renewed Hope and Energy'

Nurses & the COVID-19 Vaccine: 'It Gives Us All a Little Bit of Renewed Hope and Energy'

Liz Ellison is an RN and critical care nurse at a local hospital in Columbia. She spoke about what it’s like for her – personally – as she prepares to receive the first dose of the coronavirus vaccine.

She received the first dose of the vaccine last Thursday afternoon – just hours after our conversation.

Meals on Wheels of Columbia: 'Loneliness is Just as Fatal as a Pandemic'

Meals on Wheels of Columbia: 'Loneliness is Just as Fatal as a Pandemic'

JoNetta Weaver is the executive director of Meals on Wheels of Columbia. She spoke about how the organization continues to offer hot meals to people in need, and about how they’ve had to tackle another health crisis during the ongoing pandemic – loneliness in the senior community.

Wastewater Research 'Can Tell You the Whole Story About Society'

Wastewater Research 'Can Tell You the Whole Story About Society'

Marc Johnson and Chung-ho Lin are both researchers at the University of Missouri who study wastewater – yes, like sewage – to learn about human health and track things like outbreaks of COVID-19.

They spoke about how their research in wastewater allows them to gain insight into human health – like COVID-19 infections, and how it could be useful even once the coronavirus pandemic ends.

Columbia Neighborhood Lunch Clubs: 'How Do You Get Food Into as Many Homes as Possible?'

Columbia Neighborhood Lunch Clubs: 'How Do You Get Food Into as Many Homes as Possible?'

Jennifer Roberts is one of the organizers of the Columbia Neighborhood Lunch Clubs – a group of volunteers that collects the meals delivered to bus stops by Columbia Public Schools and delivers them door-to-door.

She spoke about how many families – from all economic backgrounds – are struggling with food access during the ongoing pandemic and how they all can utilize the Clubs’ services and make providing meals to school age kids a simpler task.

This piece was reported and produced by Chris Mitchell.

Therapists' Mental Health Needs: 'It's Like the Dirty Little Secret That We Don't Talk About'

Therapists' Mental Health Needs: 'It's Like the Dirty Little Secret That We Don't Talk About'

Beth Orns and Katie McDannald are both mental health professionals in Columbia. They spoke about how their work has an impact on their own mental health, as well as about how even they need help, at times – especially in a year like 2020.

This piece was reported and produced by Olivia Love.

'Missourians are Paying With Their Lives For Our State's Lack of Gun Laws'

'Missourians are Paying With Their Lives For Our State's Lack of Gun Laws'

Matthew Huffman works at the Missouri Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence, and we checked in – eight months into the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

He spoke about how the lives of Missourians experiencing domestic violence are being further complicated by intersecting factors – housing insecurity, continued isolation, gun violence and more.

Huffman mentioned a new report from The Violence Policy Center called “When Men Murder Women An Analysis of 2018 Homicide Data,” in which Missouri ranks 2nd for number of women killed by intimate partners.

"It's Never Been Easier to Get Care. And It's Never Been More Important to Stay Connected'

"It's Never Been Easier to Get Care. And It's Never Been More Important to Stay Connected'

Mathew Gass and Matt Lemon both work at Burrell Behavioral Health. Mathew Gass is the President of the Central Region, which includes Columbia, and Matt Lemon is the Director of Communications for the entire Burrell system – based in Springfield.

They spoke about some of the mental health impacts the ongoing coronavirus pandemic has already had on Missourians, and about the long-term community-wide mental health impacts the pandemic is likely to leave in its wake.

'We Need Strategies Where They Can Be College Students, and Still Be As Safe As Possible'

'We Need Strategies Where They Can Be College Students, and Still Be As Safe As Possible'

Lynelle Phillips and Scott Clardy both work with Columbia/Boone County Public Health and Human Services. Scott is the Assistant Director and Lynelle is a professor at the University of Missouri who leads a team of contact investigator volunteers.

They spoke about the bad rap that college age students get when it comes to testing positive for COVID-19 and about some of the ways college students can help keep themselves and their community – safe.

Special Education Amid COVID-19: 'It's Not That Kids Don't Want to Wear Masks, They Might Have a Sensory Disorder'

Special Education Amid COVID-19: 'It's Not That Kids Don't Want to Wear Masks, They Might Have a Sensory Disorder'

Amie VanMorlan lives and works in Columbia. She’s the incoming President of the local SEPTA, or special education PTA, a pediatric endocrinologist and the mom of Sagan and Damien.

Sagan is an upcoming senior, and Damien is an almost 7th grader who has Fragile X syndrome. This condition can lead to intellectual disabilities and autism, and is the leading inherited cause of intellectual disability.

Amie spoke about some of the ways Damien and rest of the family are adjusting to the world of COVID-19.

COVID-19 Within Prison: 'We're in Here, but We Have No Control Over What's Going On'

COVID-19 Within Prison: 'We're in Here, but We Have No Control Over What's Going On'

Carlos Wade is an inmate at the Southeast Correctional Center in the Bootheel, and is currently working in the facility’s medical unit to keep things sanitized and, ideally, help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

Southeast Correctional Center recently had an outbreak of COVID-19 cases – where 47 inmates and 20 staff members tested positive, so Carlos called me to talk about what life is like in prison during the ongoing pandemic and about some of his concerns.

According to the Department of Corrections, since the initial sentinel, or facility-wide testing was done, all but one inmate and three staff members have recovered from COVID-19.

Dentists Worry That Due to Pandemic, 'We're Going to See an Increase In Emergency Room Visits Again'

Dentists Worry That Due to Pandemic, 'We're Going to See an Increase In Emergency Room Visits Again'

Dr. Mack Taylor lives and works in the Bootheel. He’s the Chief Dental Officer for the SEMO Health Network and the provider at the Bernie dental clinic.

He spoke about the “new normal” of dental practice during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, and how new safety precautions are impacting the care available to patients.

Coronavirus and Columbia's Black Community: 'I Feel Like a Flood is Coming for the Vulnerable

Coronavirus and Columbia's Black Community: 'I Feel Like a Flood is Coming for the Vulnerable

Verna Laboy is a health educator for Columbia/Boone County Public Health & Human Services, and runs the Live Well by Faith program, a community-based health program that targets chronic health conditions through black churches.

The program supports health ministries at 17 black churches in the area by providing health programming, training and resources for people in the congregation, and leaders within each church help run programming and do data collection.

She spoke with Dee Campbell-Carter, a lifestyle coach for the program, about just a few of the ways the ongoing coronavirus pandemic is impacting the black community here in Columbia – and how they’re supporting one another.

COVID-19 & ASL Interpreters: 'For the First Time, Many Missourians Felt Their Voice was Recognized'

COVID-19 & ASL Interpreters: 'For the First Time, Many Missourians Felt Their Voice was Recognized'

Dr. Opeoluwa Sotonwa is the executive director of the Missouri Commission for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing in Jefferson City.

He spoke about the importance of accessible communication for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Missourians and about some recent advances – like the availability of clear masks and American Sign Language interpreters at Governor Mike Parson’s COVID-19 briefings – and how those have impacted the lives and well-being of all Missourians during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

You are hearing Dr. Opeoluwa Sotonwa as interpreted by AJ Housewright.

Oral Health & the COVID-19 Pandemic: 'Don't Forget About Your Oral Health'

Oral Health & the COVID-19 Pandemic: 'Don't Forget About Your Oral Health'

Dr. John Dane is the State Dental Director and Gary Harbison is the executive director of the Missouri Coalition for Oral Health.

They spoke about some of the concerns they have about the possible long-term impacts of COVID-19 on oral health, as many dental clinics have been closed and Missourians may have gotten out of a normal oral health routine.

College Student Mental Health: 'No One is Achieving Self-Actualization During Quarantine'

College Student Mental Health: 'No One is Achieving Self-Actualization During Quarantine'

Madeline Nash is a counselor at University Counseling Services at Truman State University in Kirksville, and full disclosure, someone I knew during my undergrad at Truman.

She spoke about her role with college students since classes moved online due to the coronavirus pandemic, and about how students – and others – should “give themselves that empathy” to mourn the loss of things like graduation during this unprecedented time.

Community Support During the Coronavirus Pandemic: 'This Kind of Mindset Prevents Suicide'

Community Support During the Coronavirus Pandemic: 'This Kind of Mindset Prevents Suicide'

Dr. Bart Andrews is the Chief Clinical Officer at Behavioral Health Response in Creve Coeur and Chair of the Missouri Suicide Prevention Network.

He spoke about the possible increased risk of suicide and suicidal thoughts during the coronavirus pandemic – and about what everyone can do to help.

This piece was reported and produced by Trevor Hook.

Family Medicine and COVID-19: 'Anything We Can Manage at Home, We Manage at Home'

Family Medicine and COVID-19: 'Anything We Can Manage at Home, We Manage at Home'

Dr. Michael Lefevre is the interim chair of MU’s Department of Family Medicine. He researches best practices in family medicine and public health, and is a physician himself.

He spoke about how the field of family medicine is changing during the COVID-19 pandemic to protect staff and patients – and to keep the most vulnerable among us, safe.

This is an excerpt from KBIA’s daily talk show, the Check-In with Janet Saidi, on Monday, April 13. You can hear the full show – here

Copyright 2017 KBIA and The University of Missouri. Development and Design by Nathan Lawrence.